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The opportunity an HOA can capitalize on is negotiating a cell tower lease agreement that ensures consistent rent for years, often decades, to come.

The opportunity an HOA can capitalize on is negotiating a cell tower lease agreement that ensures consistent rent for years, often decades, to come.

Companies like AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint continue to explore options to meet their wireless customer demands, and part of this search includes the construction of new cell sites across the United States. Cell sites come many sizes, from a traditional tower that is big enough to climb, to an antenna that sits hidden on a rooftop, only seen by those flying over.

Cell phone usage has skyrocketed to the point of near saturation in the US. According to Pew Research Center, 95% of adults have a cell phone & a growing share of Americans now use smartphones as their primary means of online access at home. In 2016, wireless subscribers’ connections hit 377.9 million, with over $1.4 trillion (yep, trillion with a “t”) having been invested globally in the last 18 years. This is BIG business & there are opportunities for landowners to capitalize.

The opportunity an HOA can capitalize on is negotiating a cell tower lease agreement that ensures consistent rent for years, often decades, to come. There are certain pros and cons that an HOA or Condo Association must ponder if a cell tower company or wireless carrier approaches them about putting a tower on their property.

 

Submit your Buildings information:

http://www.subcarrier.com/submit.php

PROS

Additional Income: If an HOA/Condo Board can properly structure a cell site agreement, it can not only see immediate rent revenue, but can also see additional upside revenue based upon the utility/value actually being derived by the wireless carrier or cell tower company’s use of their property.

Improved Cell Service: A new cell site in a community will not only serve the needs of wireless customers in the area, but can also be promoted by an HOA or Condo Association as an amenity that can be used by their residents either by way of those in their community that work from a home office, or those who have made their homes “Smart Homes” with the installation of smart technology (sound, lighting and even appliances) that rely on wireless connectivity.

Lump Sum Cash/Capital: If an HOA/Condo Association elects to do so, it can actually sell its cell tower or rooftop antenna lease for a one-time lump sum payment that can be used by a community for various projects. Many third-party companies presently exist that will pay a lump sum payment for the revenues generated from the cell site lease. If negotiated correctly, the community can retake control of the lease once the existing lease term expires.

CONS

Health Issues: Many people have raised concerns about the health risks of a cell tower on their property, or, even more troubling, cell site equipment on their rooftop. Even with the American Cancer Society providing several reports that they have found no direct links between cell towers and the development of cancer, many still protest cell towers in their communities. Providing information to its residents and structuring a cell tower lease that protects is a priority.

Aesthetic Concerns: Residents of any community always have valid concerns about the aesthetic impact on their property. Wireless carriers do often try to “stealth” their equipment by way of an installation that looks like a tree, clock tower, flagpole or other similar facility. However, many times these installations rarely blend into the community as expected. As a result, a community must determine if the financial benefits of a cell tower lease outweigh the atheistic impact.

Tenant Management: Management of a cell site lease is vastly different from the normal requests and issues that a HOA/Condo Association may presently handle. The community management team (either internal or external) could see request that they are unfamiliar with. For example, the site owner is often hit with a surge of access requests due to ever-growing operational/modification needs of wireless carriers and cell tower companies to stay current with technology standards in the wireless industry.

With the right deal in place, a cell tower could benefit your neighborhood now and for years to come. However, the pros and cons must be weighed against each other based on your particular situation. As with any long term contract, we advise getting the best information and counsel you can before making a commitment.

 

Our Members that are experts of the installation and have negotiated hundreds of tower contracts can be found on our Directory: 

ROOFTOP DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT FOR BUILDING OWNERS / MANAGERS

Subcarrier Communications is a building rooftop development, leasing and management company.

Send your building location information along with the number of stories in the building to us at: 

subcom1@subcarrier.com or call us at (732) 607-2828.

Since 1986, Subcarrier works with building owners and managers to plan for efficiently utilizing building rooftop space for leasing to the telecommunications industry.

Subcarrier also handles the management of existing wireless infrastructure. Subcarrier provides facility maintenance to ensure the structural integrity and cleanliness of the telecommunications tower site.

Please, take a few moments to fill out this form for a free building evaluation

 

 

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ANNUAL MEETING TIPS FOR ASSOCIATIONS

ANNUAL MEETING TIPS FOR ASSOCIATIONS

ANNUAL MEETING TIPS FOR ASSOCIATIONS

by Enrolled Agent Steven J. Weil, Ph.D., EA, LCAM, Royale Management Services, Inc.

 

As associations plan their annual meetings, these reminders and specific steps will be useful.

The annual meeting is a membership meeting in which every member can and should participate. Participation comes through properly-made motions, seconds, taking part in the discussion of motions and through voting.

The first order of business he is to appoint the chairperson to run the meeting.  The chairperson can be anyone who the members agree should chair the meeting.  In many associations the board president chairs the meeting; however, this requires approval of the members. Some associations ask their manager or attorney to chair the meeting.  This is acceptable as long as it is approved by the membership.  In large associations having a professional chair the meeting can help to keep it on track and see that the required business gets done properly.

A motion as to who shall chair the meeting can be made by any member of the association.  This motion must be seconded and then voted on by the members present. If the motion is approved by a majority of the member’s present, the chairperson is elected for the meeting.

The second order of business is to determine whether a quorum of the members is present in person or by proxy.  The quorum requirement is spelled out in the association documents or by state statute.  Without a quorum, no business can take place at the meeting.  However, ballots must still be collected.

The third order of business is to appoint the election monitors. Election monitors will supervise and participate in the counting of the ballots cast.  Election monitors may not be candidates for the board or members of a candidates’ family.

The fourth order of business is to collect the ballots.  All ballots received by mail prior to the election and brought to the meeting should be delivered to the election monitors and placed in the ballot box.

Ballots must be collected, and all ballots must be properly cast, i.e., enclosed in an outside envelope which shows the unit number, name of voting member and signature and then enclosed in an inner envelope which should not provide any identity information.

Note: ballots cannot be accepted once the counting process begins.  Thus, it is important to make an announcement that all ballots must be cast before the counting can begin and not to accept any additional ballots once the counting process has begun.

Ballots are then verified for the association ownership records and voting certificates. Units with more than one owner, units owned by a trust, or units owned by a corporation must have a voting certificate on file that shows who is authorized to vote for the unit.

For the election to be valid and counting to continue, at least 20% of the eligible unit owners must have cast a ballot.

Next, the outside envelopes are opened and separated from the ballots, which are still sealed in the inner envelope.  Once all outside envelopes are opened, the ballots are returned to the ballot box and mixed before opening the inside envelope.  Ballots are then opened and counted.

At the conclusion of the ballot count, the results are announced; and the ballots, counts, outer and inner envelopes must be saved as part of the association’s official records for a period of three years.

The fifth order of business (if a quorum is present) is the reading and approval or waiver of reading and approval of last year’s meeting minutes.

The sixth order of business is to conduct the remaining business of the association, including the reading or presentation of any officer and or committee reports, old business from last year, new business for this year, owner comments and questions.

The final thing to do is to adjourn the meeting. The chairperson can ask for a motion to adjourn the meeting, which must be seconded and voted on by the members.

It should be noted that in most associations, newly elected board members begin their term immediately once the vote has been concluded.

It is also advisable to schedule an organizational board meeting to immediately follow the annual meeting.  In this way officers can be appointed and take their positions without a lapse in leadership.

 

SFPMA MEMBER - Find us on the Members Directory
Royale Management Services, a registered and licensed community association management corporation in Florida, works with association Boards of Directors throughout South Florida to oversee the daily activities required for proper management, helping to educate them on their responsibilities, duties, and obligations. Royale’s team members are highly trained in all aspects of community association management and customer service to ensure that proper procedures are followed that keep the association in compliance with all of the rules governing elections, budgeting, accounting, operation, collection and assessment. The firm and its president are members of the Community Association Institute (CAI) and the Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce.
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Is it time to Clean your Air Conditioning Air Ducts and Filters.

Is it time to Clean your Air Conditioning Air Ducts and Filters.

  • Posted: Sep 16, 2017
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With the passing of IRMA, We suggest cleaning your air ducts and change filters.

Sitting water causes mold even when your home’s Electric has been off for a while the humid air can cause ducts and filters to collect water. We think the best way to protect your family from health concerns is to Clean Duct work and A/C Systems Filter Replacement.

A wise person told me a while back “Change your Filter every time you pay your Electric Bill” I like this but we don’t think you have to do this monthly, But Every 2 months this should be completed.

The Environmental Protection Agency recommends cleaning air ducts when:

• You suspect mold exists in the air ducts.

• You notice a vermin infestation somewhere in the home, or you see insects or rodents entering or exiting ductwork.

• You see a visible “poof” of dust released from the supply registers when air is exiting the vents.

Experts recommends taking a look inside your air vent register. “If you notice black debris around the outside, that’s pollutants that have been recycled through the system over and over again, and that’s a sign your system is excessively soiled,” he says. “Also, take a look at your system when you change your filter. If there’s a lot of dust buildup in that area, that’s another sign you’re overdue for a cleaning.”

Our A/C systems do a good job of removing this humidity. But over time, the damp air — combined with dust and debris that get past the air filter — begin to accumulate inside the air handler, blower and even through the duct system of the air conditioner. And that provides a breeding ground for mold.

 

Find Local A/C Companies ready to  help with Cleaning your Air Conditioning Ducts.

 

Featured Members:  Find Top Companies working in the Property Management Industry.

SmithCo.:  Is a full service Residential & Commercial Air Conditioning company that can provide new installations, service, and maintenance to any system for any home or business.

First Call Services:  With more than 26 years of experience in the field with expertise in Moisture Assessments, Building Diagnostics, and Residential Central Air Conditioning System Design.

JOHNSTONE SUPPLY – FORT LAUDERDALE # 36: You may wish to buy top quality A/C Parts, Filters on your own.  > Vist Johnstone Supply.

 

Become a Member: Have your company listed on our Directory, being used by over 4500 Property Management, Condo and HOA’s all over Florida.

 

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Aaxon Success Story- The Residences on Hollywood Beach

Aaxon Success Story- The Residences on Hollywood Beach

  • Posted: Aug 26, 2017
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Residences in Hollywood Beach

Sitting atop gorgeous golden sand and overlooking the Atlantic Ocean is The Residences on Hollywood Beach condominium, a chic 15-story condominium building off of Ocean Drive in Hollywood, Florida.

Steven Zamora of Atlantic Pacific Management is the property manager of The Residences and chose Aaxon for his community’s large laundry room retool and upgrade to stainless steel Smart Card-operated machines.

“My experience dealing with Aaxon since the beginning has been beyond spectacular,” says Steven. “From the contract negotiations to the scheduling of removing old equipment and putting in new, to the final completion- everything has gone smoothly!”

Housing more than 2,000 residents with 31 laundry rooms, Aaxon tackled the large-scale project quickly and efficiently.

Aaxon replaced the condominium’s current machines with high-end stainless-steel Speed Queen Quantum Commercial Washers and Dryers equipped with SmartCard technology. The machines will service the entire two-building condominium property.

“The equipment and technology they provided to the building are excellent, above the industry standard. Their commission split is very competitive,” Steven adds. “I highly recommend Aaxon for your laundry business needs.” Watch Steven Zamora’s video testimonial here.

Ready for a fresh, clean laundry room? Contact Us Today.

SFPMA MEMBER - Find us on the Members Directory
Amber is Marketing Coordinator at Aaxon Laundry Systems, one of the nation's innovators in coin/card laundry design and development, multi-housing laundry room solutions and on-premise laundry equipment applications. Amber works closely with Aaxon’s multi-housing team to tell the stories of multi-housing laundry room transformations, laundromat retool projects, and new entrepreneur success stories. A University of Central Florida alumna, she has nearly a decade of experience in the writing and communications fields.
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Meet Your Florida Laundry Service Company

Meet Your Florida Laundry Service Company

  • Posted: Aug 14, 2017
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Aaxon Laundry Systems, based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida is your number one choice for the most reliable multi-housing laundry services in the state. Trusted for more than 40 years, Aaxon has been transforming multi-housing laundry rooms in condominiums and apartments statewide.

Our dedicated Aaxon Consultants are multi-housing laundry equipment experts, with decades of experience working with property managers and board members alike to deliver the best for tenants. Aaxon consultants guide you every step of the way throughout the entire commercial laundry equipment leasing process, leaving no questions left unanswered.

Commercial Laundry Equipment Services

Aaxon provides commercial washer and dryer leasing for multi-housing properties throughout Florida, including condominiums, apartments, on premise laundry facilities in clinics, police stations, factories, and more. Our full-service commercial laundry equipment company operates entirely in-house and does not outsource any installations or deliveries, staying true to providing our customers with the best service possible. All laundry equipment installations are performed by screened and skilled technicians who will neatly install your laundry equipment hassle-free. Aaxon has laundry equipment installation experience in high-rise condominiums with multiple laundry rooms, low-rise condominiums, apartments, and more across the state of Florida. In addition, Aaxon offers laundry room enhancement services to qualifying multi-housing properties.

Coin or card laundry equipment leasing
Whether you prefer coin-operated laundry equipment for your tenants, or the advanced card-operated laundry equipment technology, Aaxon provides and services both types of equipment. Get in touch with an Aaxon Multi-Housing consultant today to learn more about each and which is best for your property.

Unmatched Customer Support
Aaxon prides itself on serving up amazing customer support to clients before, during, and after the installation as well as throughout the life of the lease. Property managers and tenants are able to reach our friendly customer service staff by calling, texting, emailing, or submitting a service request through our website anytime. If a laundry equipment repair is needed, Aaxon guarantees service requests to be fulfilled within 48 business hours.  ­

Choosing the right laundry equipment leasing provider is an important decision, and Aaxon is here to guide you through the entire process. Contact us today for a complimentary laundry equipment Lease Analysis.

Hundreds of Miami multi-housing communities trust Aaxon Laundry Systems with all of their laundry needs.

Aaxon Laundry Systems team

Aaxon Laundry Systems team.

SFPMA MEMBER - Find us on the Members Directory
Amber is Marketing Coordinator at Aaxon Laundry Systems, a Huebsch distributorship based in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Amber works closely with Aaxon’s consultants to tell the stories of multi housing laundry room transformations, laundromat retool projects, and new entrepreneur success stories. A University of Central Florida alumna, she has nearly a decade of experience in the writing and communications fields.
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COPING WITH FL H.B. 1237 (2017)

COPING WITH FL H.B. 1237 (2017)

  • Posted: Aug 01, 2017
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COPING WITH FL H.B. 1237 (2017)

by Steven J. Weil, Ph.D., EA, LCAM, Royale Management Services, Inc.

Whenever the Legislature puts new laws on the books, in order to avoid becoming involved in expensive litigation, managers and board members are obliged to sort out what it all means along with what steps should be taken to address the real meaning, terms and conditions that the courts and judges conclude were the Legislature’s intent.

Florida’s Governor signed Florida House Bill 1237 (2017) into law on June 26, 2017.  The legislation went into effect on July 1, 2017 and added several requirements and prohibitions to the Florida Condominium Act (Chapter 718).

For example, HB 1237, now the law of the land in Florida, states, “Board members may serve 2-year terms if permitted by the bylaws or articles of incorporation. a board member may not serve more than four consecutive 2-year terms, unless approved by an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the total voting interests of the association.” The law also includes an exception if there are not enough eligible candidates to fill all board positions which allows current board members to continue beyond the otherwise prescribed period.

What is yet to be determined is whether this means a board member may serve no more than eight one-year terms, or, if association rules limit terms to one year, the four-term limitation still applies? Other questions still left unanswered include: When do these terms start? Is the law to be enforced retroactively, or are board members prior terms excluded from the new rule?

Another new rule states that a condo board member, despite good intentions, could be subject to penalties for violation of this caveat:  “An association may not employ or contract with any service provider that is owned or operated by a board member or any person who has a financial relationship with a board member.”  Under a strict interpretation of this update to the law, if a board member runs a pool service and is taking care of the association’s pool maintenance for only the cost of chemicals, that board member could end up facing criminal penalties for trying to help out.

Conflicts of interest (such as a board member providing a proposal from a company they are affiliated with) may have long existed, and while board members always should have abstained from any vote where it could be perceived that they had a financial conflict of interest, it could now be a criminal offense.

This is not the only place a condo officer, director or manager could find themselves facing the threat of criminal penalties.  While we all know, or at least should know, kickbacks of any kind are wrong, often accusations made by a unit owner are not grounded in reality and instead are based on little more than spite and mistrust.

However, The updated Florida Statute 718.111 now reads “[A]n officer, director, or manager may not solicit, offer to accept, or accept any thing or service of value or kickback for which consideration has not been provided for his or her own benefit or that of his or her immediate family, from any person providing or proposing to provide goods or services to the association. Any such officer, director, or manager who knowingly so solicits, offers to accept, or accepts any thing or service of value or kickback is subject to a civil penalty pursuant to s. 718.501(1)(d) and, if applicable, a criminal penalty.”

The updated statute goes on to require that an officer or director who is charged with certain crimes (primarily crimes of dishonest character) shall be removed from office and provides requirements for filling the vacancy left by any such removal. The silver lining here is that you have to be charged with a crime before you can be removed, a mere accusation is not enough.

Will these and other provisions that have been added to the law make it even more difficult to find volunteers who are willing to serve as board members? No one really knows yet. What we do know is, it will probably take years for the legislature and the courts to sort this new law out.  We also know that those who serve on our boards of directors are most often well-meaning volunteers who want to do the right thing and serve their fellow owners.  All we can do is hope that none of these changes make it harder to get these good people to serve, and the law works as intended keeping those with a self-serving agenda from throwing their hat in the ring.

We are not attorneys, and anything said here should not be construed as legal advice. This article is purely for educational purposes, with the goal of helping associations better understand current updates to the law. Royale Management Services team members are Licensed Community Association Managers (LCAM) who work with associations to manage, to navigate and to comply with the law.  As you can see, these changes raise several questions, and you can be sure that until these issues are addressed by a court, no one will really know the correct answers. Nevertheless, it is always advisable to seek legal counsel if an issue arises.

SFPMA MEMBER - Find us on the Members Directory
Royale Management Services, a registered and licensed community association management corporation in Florida, works with association Boards of Directors throughout South Florida to oversee the daily activities required for proper management, helping to educate them on their responsibilities, duties, and obligations. Royale’s team members are highly trained in all aspects of community association management and customer service to ensure that proper procedures are followed that keep the association in compliance with all of the rules governing elections, budgeting, accounting, operation, collection and assessment. The firm and its president are members of the Community Association Institute (CAI) and the Fort Lauderdale Chamber of Commerce.
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A few tips and reminders with everyone, as associations plan their annual meetings

A few tips and reminders with everyone, as associations plan their annual meetings

  • Posted: Jul 12, 2017
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As associations plan their annual meetings, we thought we would share a few tips and reminders with everyone.

Annual Meetings

RePublished with permission from Our Members:  http://royalemanagement.com/home/

Royale Management Services, Inc.

2319 N. Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale FL 33311
Phone: (954) 563-1269 | (800) 382-1040 | Fax: (954) 563-2153 | Email: CAM@rmsaccounting.com

 

The annual meeting is a member meeting, hence every member can participate. Participation is by properly made motions, seconds, taking part in discussion of motions and through voting.

The first order of business is to appoint the chairperson to run the meeting.  The chairperson can be anyone that the members agree should chair the meeting.  In many associations the board president chairs the meeting; however this requires approval of the members. Some associations ask their manager or attorney to chair the meeting which is acceptable as long as this is approved by the membership.  In large associations having a professional chair the meeting can help to keep it on track and see that the required business gets done properly.

A motion can be made by any member of the association as to who shall chair the meeting.  This motion must be seconded and then voted on by the members present. If the motion is approved by a majority of the member’s present, the chairperson is elected for the meeting.

The Second order of business is to determine whether a quorum of the members is present in person or by proxy.  The quorum requirement is spelled out in the association documents or by state statute.  Without a quorum no business can take place at the meeting.  However, ballots must still be collected.

The third order of business is to appoint the election monitors. Election monitors will supervise and participate in the counting of the ballots cast.  Election monitors may not be candidates for the board or members of a candidates’ family.

The fourth order of business is to collect the ballots.  All ballots received by mail prior to the election and brought to the meeting should be delivered to the election monitors and placed in the ballot box.

Ballots must be collected, all ballots must be in properly cast (enclosed in an outside envelope which shows the  unit number, name of voting member and signature and then enclosed in an inner envelope which should not provide any  identity information).

Note ballots cannot be accepted once the counting process begins.  So it is important to make an announcement that all ballots must be cast before the counting can begin and to not accept any additional ballots once the counting process has begun.

Ballots are then verified to the association ownership records and voting certificates. Units with more than one owner, units owned by a trust or units owned by a corporation must have a voting certificate on file that shows who is authorized to vote for the unit.

For the election to be valid and counting to continue at least 20% of the eligible unit owners must of cast a ballot.

Next the outside envelopes are opened and separated from the ballots which are still sealed in the inner envelope.  Once all outside envelopes are opened the ballots are returned to the ballot box and mixed before opening the inside envelope.  Ballots are then opened and counted.

At the conclusion of the ballot count the results are announced and the ballots, counts, outer and inner envelopes must be saved as part of the association’s official records for a period of 3 years.

The fifth order of business (if a quorum is present) is the reading and approval or waiver or reading and approval of last year’s meeting minutes.

The sixth order of business is to conduct the remaining business of the association including; the reading or presentation of any officer and or committee reports;  old business from last year;  new business for this year; owner comments and questions.

Last thing to do is to adjourn the meeting the chairperson can ask for a motion to adjourn the meeting which must be seconded and voted on by the members.

It should be noted that in most associations, newly elected board members begin their term immediately once the vote has been concluded.

It is also advisable to schedule an organizational board meeting to immediately follow the annual meeting in this way officers can be appointed and take their positions without a lapse in leadership.

 

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